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MG MGB

The MGB is a two-door sports car manufactured and marketed by the  British Motor Corporation  (BMC), later British Leyland, as a four-cylinder, soft-top  roadster  from 1962 until 1980. Variants include the MGB GT three-door 2+2 coupe  (1965–80), the six-cylinder roadster and coupé  MGC  (1967–69), and the eight-cylinder 2+2 coupé, the MGB GT V8 (1973–76). Replacing the MGA  in 1962, production of the MGB and its variants continued until 1980, achieving sales for the MGB, MGC and MGB GT V8 combined of 523,836 cars. 

In structure the MGB was an innovative, modern design in 1962, utilizing a monocoque  structure instead of the traditional body-on-frame  construction used on both the MGA and MG T- types  and the MGB's rival, the Triumph series However components such as brakes and suspension were developments of the earlier 1955 MGA with the B-Series engine having its origins in 1947.

The lightweight design reduced manufacturing costs while adding to overall vehicle strength. Wind-up windows were standard, and a comfortable driver's compartment offered plenty of legroom. A parcel shelf was fitted behind the seats. The MGB achieved a 0–60 mph (96 km/h) time of just over 11 seconds.

The three-bearing 1798 cc B-series engine produced 95 hp (71 kW) at 5,400 rpm — upgraded in October 1964 to a five-bearing crankshaft. The MGB was one of the first cars to feature controlled crumple zones  designed to protect the driver and passenger in a 30 mph (48 km/h) impact with an immovable barrier (200 ton).